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Thread: Bullseye pollution problems

  1. #61
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    Default Re: Bullseye pollution problems

    Hahaha, no way. He didn't earn it or anything.


    You shouldn't be having sex for pleasure, only for reproduction.
    Thousands of people read my threads now. So Iím trying to not embarrass myself.

  2. #62
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    Default Re: Bullseye pollution problems

    Shut up and blow glass.

    ~Misha

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    Default Re: Bullseye pollution problems

    ~Misha

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    Default Re: Bullseye pollution problems

    https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/eisler/CHR_12_Arsenic.pdf

    copied

    SOURCES, FATE, AND USES
    Global production of arsenic is estimated to be 75,000 to 100,000 tons annually, of which the United States
    produces about 21,000 tons and uses about 44,000 tons; major quantities are imported from Sweden, the
    world's leading producer (NAS 1977; EPA 1980). Almost all (97%) of the arsenic made worldwide enters endproduct
    manufacture in the form of arsenic trioxide (As2O3), and the rest is used as additives in producing
    special lead and copper alloys (NAS 1977). More than 80% of the As2O3 is used to manufacture products with
    agricultural application, such as insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, algicides, sheep dips, wood preservatives,
    dyestuffs, and the medicines for eradication of tapeworm in sheep and cattle (NAS 1977). The sole producer
    and refiner of As2O3 in the United States is a copper smelter in Tacoma, Washington (NAS 1977).
    Arsenic naturally occurs as sulfides and as complex sulfides of iron, nickel, and cobalt (Woolson 1975). In
    one form or another, arsenic is present in rocks, soils, water, and living organisms at concentrations of parts per
    billion to parts per million (NAS 1977). Soil arsenic levels are normally elevated near arseniferous deposits, and
    in mineralized zones containing gold, silver, and sulfides of lead and zinc (Dudas 1984). Secondary iron oxides
    formed from the weathering of pyrite act as scavengers of arsenic (Dudas 1984). Pyrite is a known carrier of
    arsenic and may contain up to 5,600 mg/kg; for example, total arsenic is 10X above normal background levels in
    soils derived from pyritic shale (Dudas 1984). Natural weathering of rocks and soils adds about 40,000 tons of
    arsenic to the oceans yearly, accounting for <0.01 mg/l input to water on a global basis (NRCC 1978). Many
    species of marine plants and animals often contain naturally high concentrations of arsenic (NAS 1977), but it is
    4
    usually present in a harmless organic form (Woolson 1975). Anthropogenic input of arsenic to the environment
    is substantial, and exceeds that contributed by natural weathering processes by a factor of about 3X (NRCC
    1978).
    The most important concept with respect to arsenic cycling in the environment is constant change. Arsenic
    is ubiquitous in living tissue and is constantly being oxidized, reduced, or otherwise metabolized. In soils,
    insoluble or slightly soluble arsenic compounds are constantly being resolubilized, and the arsenic is being
    presented for plant uptake or reduction by organisms and chemical processes. Man reportedly has modified the
    arsenic cycle only by causing localized high concentrations (NAS 1977). The speciation of arsenic in the
    environment. is affected partly by indiscriminate biological uptake, which consumes about 20% of the dissolved
    arsenate pool and results in measurable cooncentrations of reduced and methylated arsenic species. The overall
    arsenic cycle is similar to the phosphate cycle; however, regeneration time for arsenic is much slower--on the
    order of several months (Sanders 1980). The ubiquity of arsenic in the environment is evidence of the
    redistribution processes that have been operating since early geologic time (Woolson 1975). A prehuman
    steady state solution to the global arsenic cycle (Austin and Millward 1984) indicates that major reservoirs of
    arsenic (in kilotons) are magma (50 billion), sediments (25 billion), oceanic deep waters (1.56 million), land (1.4
    million), and ocean mixed layers (270,000); minor amounts occur in ocean particulates (100), and in continental
    (2.5) and marine tropospheres (0.069). Arsenic is significantly mobilized from the land to the troposphere by
    both natural and anthropogenic processes. Industrial emissions account for about 30% of the present day
    burden of arsenic in the troposphere (Austin and Millward 1984). Agronomic ecosystems, for example, may
    receive arsenic from agricultural sources such as organic herbicides, irrigation waters, and fertilizers, and from
    such nonagricultural sources as fossil fuels and industrial and municipal wastes (Woolson 1975). Arsenic is
    mobile and nonaccumulative in air, pant, and water phases of agronomic ecosystems; arsenicals sometimes
    accumulate in soils, but redistribution mechanisms usually preclude hazardous accumulations (Woolson 1975).
    Arsenic compounds have been used in medicine since the time of Hippocrates, ca. 400 BC (Woolson 1975).
    Inorganic arsenicals have been used for centuries, and organoarsenicals for at least a century in the treatment
    of syphylis, yaws, amoebic dysentery, and trypanosomiasis (NAS 1977). During the period 1200 to 1650,
    however, arsenic was used extensively in homicides (NRCC 1978). In 1815, the first accidental death was reported from arsine (AsH3) poisoning, and in 1900-1903 accidental poisonings from consumption of arseniccontaminated beer were widely reported (NRCC 1978). In 1938, it was established that arsenic can counteract selenium toxicity (NRCC 1978). The introduction of arsphenamine, an organoarsenical, to control venereal disease earlier this century gave rise to intensive research by organic chemists, which resulted in the synthesis of at least 32,000 arsenic compounds. But the advent of penicillin and other newer drugs nearly eliminated the use of organic arsenicals as human therapeutic agents (EPA 1980). Arsenical drugs are still used in treating
    certain tropical diseases, such as African sleeping sickness and amoebic dysentery, and are used in veterinary medicine to treat parasitic diseases, including filariasis in dogs (Canis familiaris) and blackhead in turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) and chickens, Gallus spp. (NAS 1977). Today, abnormal sources of arsenic that can enter the food chain from plants or animals include arsenical pesticides such as lead arsenate; arsenic acid, HAsO3; sodium arsenite, NaAsO2; sodium arsenate, Na2AsO4; and cacodylic acid, (CH3)2 As(OH) (NAS 1977). The major uses of arsenic are in the production of herbicides, insecticides, desiccants, wood preservatives, and growth stimulants for plants and animals. Much smaller amounts are used in the manufacture of glass (nearly all of which contains 0.2% to 1.0% arsenic as an additive--primarily as a decolorizing agent) and textiles, and in medical and veterinary applications (NAS 1977; EPA 1980). Arsenic is also an ingredient in lewisite, a blistering poison gas developed (but not used) during World War I, and in various police riot control agents (NAS 1977). The availability of arsenic in certain local areas has been increased by various human activities: smelting and refining of gold, silver, copper, zinc, uranium, and lead ores; combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal and gasoline; burning of vegetation from cotton gins treated with arsenical pesticides; careless or extensive use of arsenical herbicides, pesticides, and defoliants; dumping of land wastes and sewage sludge (1.1 mg/l) in areas that allow leaching into groundwater; use of domestic detergents in wash water (2.5 to 1,000 mg As/1); manufacture of glass; and by the sinking of drinking water wells into naturally arseniferous rock (NRCC 1978; EPA 1980). There are several major anthropogenic sources of environmental arsenic contamination: industrial smelters--the effluent from a copper smelter in Tacoma, Washington, contained up to 70 tons of arsenic discharged yearly into nearby Puget Sound ((NRCC 1978); coal-fired power plants, which collectively emit about 3,000 tons of arsenic annually in the United States (EPA 1980); and production and use of arsenical pesticides, coupled with careless disposal of used pesticide containers (NAS 1977). Elevated levels of arsenic have been reported in soils near smelters, in acid mine spoils...




    if anyone has information on what's being released when we torch the glass that would be helpful to me.
    I would like to know more but don't know where i'd find that info. pm me or whatever
    Last edited by LooseSeal Baller; 02-18-2016 at 05:13 AM.

  5. #65
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    Default Re: Bullseye pollution problems

    Quote Originally Posted by PyroChixRock View Post
    I especially love the last line in that "article", Misha:

    "Attorney Advertising. Case results depend on a variety of factors unique to each case. Case results do not guarantee or predict a similar result in any future case."

    I'm sure you caught it, but in case anyone else didn't, although it is written to look like a news article this is an ad seeking clients for a big class action suit. Chase ambulances much? While something like this was predictable from right from the start, it's still a bit disconcerting to actually see it in print. You can be sure this whole thing is on a fast road to nowhere good.

    .
    Last edited by brads; 02-18-2016 at 09:05 AM. Reason: edited for clarification

  6. #66
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    Default Re: Bullseye pollution problems

    I said the other day, those employees probably have lawyers waiting at their cars at the end of each shift. Not only are they in line for potential class action from the community, but the employees if they decided to, could probably really screw them.



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  7. #67
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    Default Re: Bullseye pollution problems

    And now there are videos of Protestors outside of Bullseye...
    Quote Originally Posted by $$$$$$$ View Post
    This thread is sweet, keep it going. Keep describing the piece without pics and we'll try to picture it and ask cool questions, such as where's the pics or post pics..
    Quote Originally Posted by DickFarm Glass View Post
    I'm no longer learning to blow glass...Back to the shop with my bad ass self, this Lambo isn't going to buy itself

  8. #68
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    Default Re: Bullseye pollution problems

    The worst thing, for me, to see about this is glass people turning on other glass people. Sure, maybe bullseye could have done more, but so could have almost every other business in the world. At the end of the day we are all trying to feed our families.

    Stick together. One love, one flame.
    ~Misha

  9. #69
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    Default Re: Bullseye pollution problems

    I welcome any and all Glass Companies that want to move to the Wild Wild SouthWest!

    I'd love a few color companies a bit closer to me
    Quote Originally Posted by $$$$$$$ View Post
    This thread is sweet, keep it going. Keep describing the piece without pics and we'll try to picture it and ask cool questions, such as where's the pics or post pics..
    Quote Originally Posted by DickFarm Glass View Post
    I'm no longer learning to blow glass...Back to the shop with my bad ass self, this Lambo isn't going to buy itself

  10. #70
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    Default Re: Bullseye pollution problems

    what being released when we torch the glass?
    Gray matter summed it up nicely, earlier in this tread.

  11. #71
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    Default Re: Bullseye pollution problems

    ~Misha

  12. #72
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    Default Re: Bullseye pollution problems

    Link to the same letter, but including a video from Mr. Schwoerer:
    http://www.bullseyeglass.com/news/a-...schwoerer.html

  13. #73
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    Default Re: Bullseye pollution problems

    ~Misha

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    Default Re: Bullseye pollution problems


  15. #75
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    Default Re: Bullseye pollution problems

    Tangentially related to this issue, briefly touching on Uroboros and Spectrum

    http://talk.craftweb.com/showthread.php?t=11019

  16. #76
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    Default Re: Bullseye pollution problems

    And now the shit really starts hitting the fan.

    http://katu.com/news/local/7-se-port...enic-southeast
    ~Misha

  17. #77
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    Default Re: Bullseye pollution problems

    http://glassalchemy.com/blogs/the-fo...ly-unavailable

    Looks like GA has at least temporarily stopped production of crayolas and lemon drop... I imagine as a result of this. Just in case no one had noticed the blog post.

  18. #78
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    Default Re: Bullseye pollution problems

    Finally, a little sanity begins to creep into this over-hyped shitshow...

  19. #79
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    Default Re: Bullseye pollution problems

    Thanks for the URL brad. Here's a couple more updates.


    http://mobile.reuters.com/article/idUSKCN0WB2VS

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	image.jpeg 
Views:	13 
Size:	411.5 KB 
ID:	82740
    ~Misha

  20. #80
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    Default Re: Bullseye pollution problems

    https://youtu.be/5gI3PPyXLNE



    Dammit, can't get the video to post right...
    Last edited by brads; 03-10-2016 at 10:37 AM.

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